Miss Catina Bernardis

BSc FRCS (Plast)

Miss Bernardis is a Consultant Plastic Surgeon at St Thomas’ Hospital, specialising in Hand Surgery and surgery for patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa. She was appointed to this substantive post in 2005.

Career to Date

Miss Bernardis studied Medicine at Charing Cross and Westminster Hospital and obtained a BSc in Physiology and Biochemistry, graduating as a doctor in 1989. As a Junior Doctor, she obtained surgical training in Cardiothoracic and General Surgery at St George’s Hospital, London; Neurosurgery at Atkinson Morley Hospital, London; Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery at Northwick Park Hospital; and Orthopaedic Surgery at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge; becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England (FRCS) in 1995.

Following initial training in Plastics and Burns Surgery at Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, and Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Miss Bernardis subsequently completed her Plastic Surgery training in The Pan Thames Training Scheme in London, gaining a wealth of experience working as a Plastic Surgery Registrar at St Thomas’ Hospital, London; The Queen Victoria, East Grinstead; and St George’s Hospital, London. She was awarded the Specialist Fellowship in Plastic Surgery (FRCS Plast) in 2002.

After completing her training, Miss Bernardis spent two months in Ganga Hospital in Coimbatore, Southern India, undertaking a fellowship in trauma reconstruction; and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore gaining experience in surgery for obstetrical and traumatic brachial plexus injuries. In addition, Miss Bernardis undertook Fellowships in hand surgery with David Evans at the Hand Clinic in Windsor; and Aesthetic Surgery at the Wellington Hospital, London.

Miss Bernardis subsequently was appointed as a Locum Plastic Surgery Consultant at The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, managing patients with both General Plastics and Hand Elective and traumatic conditions, including microsurgical hand reconstruction and cover of traumatic defects.

As a specialist in Hand Surgery, Miss Bernardis manages all types of Elective and traumatic hand conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, Dupuytren’s disease, tenosynovitis (including trigger finger and De Quervain’s tenosynovitis), as well as tendon repair and reconstruction, microsurgical nerve repair and fixation of hand fractures. Her other main area of interest is the multidisciplinary care of patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa, in particular hand contractures and skin cancer caused by this disease. Miss Bernardis was Clinical Lead of the Plastic Surgery Department for 2 years.

Miss Bernardis joined The London Orthopaedic Clinic in 2014 and works closely with Mr Brian Cohen, our upper limb specialist.

Miss Catina Bernardis gave me a detailed explanation of my condition and suggested a clear path to follow. Her manners were impecable.

November 7, 2016

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