Carpal Tunnel syndrome

Caused by compression of the median nerve in the wrist due to pressure building within the tunnel and this causes the nerve to functional abnormally. This leads to numbness, tingling and pain in the hand, fingers and sometimes forearm. Other symptoms include pain during the night, clumsiness and thenar atrophy. The nerve can be compressed in several ways including tenosynoyitis, joint dislocations, fractures and arthritis which can all narrow the tunnel. Fluid retention during pregnancy can also cause swelling and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thyroid conditions, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes are also associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. X-ray and nerve conduction studies may be undertaken to confirm diagnosis and assess severity. This condition can be treated non-surgically through changing patterns of hand use, keeping the wrist splinted in a straight position and anti-inflammatory medication may reduce symptoms. If symptoms are severe, surgery may be required to reduce the pressure on the nerve, however Carpal tunnel symptoms may not completely resolve after surgery in especially severe cases.

More posts

Blog posts

  • Hand Therapist Receives Royal Recognition

    Katherine Butler is the hand therapist for The London Orthopaedic Clinic and is based at King Edward VII’s Hospital. She was presented to HRH The Prince of Wales at The Royal Society of Musicians as he opened the Society’s new building in London. Katherine is an Honorary Associate Professor at UCL and Plymouth University and […]