Autologous Conditioned Plasma (ACP) / Platelet-rich plasma (PRP)

What is Autologous Conditioned Plasma (ACP)/Platelet-rich plasma (PRP)

Autologous Conditioned Plasma or ACP, as it is more commonly known, is plasma that is rich in platelets. Another closely related procedure uses Platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Blood is extracted from a patient and then ACP/PRP is extracted using the process of centrifugation. ACP/PRP is usually used in order to facilitate the process of regeneration in orthopaedic and surgical procedures. ACP/PRP is used in the healing process of a patient and ensures that a patient is sufficiently supplied with his/ her own blood, blood that has been furthered treated to boost the healing process.

What is it for?

ACP/PRP is used for healing especially in the case of orthopaedic related injuries. This includes injuries of muscles, tendons, ligaments or even bones and joints.  The Autologous Conditioned Plasma is rich in platelets. This better enables it to perform the process of healing.

What the process is like?

For the patient, the process is pretty much similar to a regular blood test. A small sample of blood is extracted from the patient’s body using a syringe – just like in a blood test. The blood is drawn from a superficial vein in a small quantity. After the blood is drawn, the role of a patient is over – temporarily. This blood is then passed through the process of centrifugation (rapid spinning to separate out the different elements of the blood). In this process, the autologous conditioned plasma is separated from other components present in the blood. After the ACP/PRP is conditioned, it is then injected back into the body of the patient at the point where it is needed.


This information is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. All material provided on this Site is provided for information purposes only. Always seek the advice of a doctor with any questions you have regarding a medical condition, before applying any diet, exercise, other health program, or other procedure set out on this Site.

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